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Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

No Jargon, the Scholars Strategy Network’s weekly podcast, presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation. Powerful research, intriguing perspectives -- and no jargon. Find show notes and plain-language research briefs on hundreds of topics at www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/nojargon.
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Now displaying: 2016
Jul 5, 2016

Rocío Garcia describes how social class, race, gender, and citizenship status impact access to reproductive health care. To become more inclusive, the reproductive rights movement must address these factors and move beyond being just “pro-choice”.

Jun 28, 2016

David Dagan outlines the GOP’s journey from being “tough on crime” to embracing prison reform. Despite falling crime rates, the party could only change from the inside - with key Republicans leading the way after experiencing prison for themselves.

Jun 21, 2016

Professors Blasi, Freeman, and Kruse stay post-interview to discuss why trade unions, business schools, and foundations should get on board with employee ownership and profit sharing programs.

Jun 21, 2016

Professors Blasi, Freeman, and Kruse explain how sharing the ownership or profits of a company with workers can improve productivity, pay, and work life quality - all while reducing economic inequality.

Jun 14, 2016

Professor Anna Law lays out meaningful and responsible reforms that the next President could use to address immigration. Law encourages the incoming administration to look beyond the undocumented population and learn from history’s failures and successes.

Jun 7, 2016

Professor Sofya Aptekar explores the gift economy through Freecycle, a network of groups where people can give and receive used items. Aptekar examines how income inequality and consumption patterns impact the organization, people, and the environment.

May 31, 2016

Professor Jamila Michener discusses one way the U.S. tries to incorporate low-income and minority individuals into the political system and why the effort has been failing. The core issues are those of partisanship, race, and who implements policies.

May 24, 2016

Professor Saher Selod explains how 9/11 changed the lives of Muslims in America. This small and diverse group faces hostility, discriminatory policies, and Islamophobic rhetoric in the media and now the 2016 election in the name of national security.

May 17, 2016

Joshua Kalla describes a new door to door canvassing technique, “deep canvassing,” that encourages voters to tell their own stories of discrimination and leads to dramatic, long-lasting decreases in prejudice.

May 11, 2016

Professor Christopher Parker shows the role of racial resentment in the rise of the Tea Party and connects it to “the paranoid style” in American politics. Parker points to white fears of America’s changing demographics as a driving force in today’s GOP.

May 3, 2016

Professor Lawrence Jacobs reveals how America’s central bank, the Federal Reserve, used the 2008 financial crisis to expand its size and authority. With little accountability, this institution has favored big banks and increased economic inequality.

Apr 26, 2016

Professor Jacob Hacker shows how the war on government made America forget the root of its prosperity - a healthy mix of government and business. This was no accident, as a more politicized business community helped shift public discourse and then policy.

Apr 19, 2016

Professor Paul Pierson presents the forgotten history of American prosperity: how public and private sectors worked together for economic growth and social progress. This mixed economy increased life spans, built infrastructure, and spurred innovation.

Apr 12, 2016

Vanessa Williamson dispels the misconception that Americans hate taxes. In fact, most Americans support taxes and are willing to increase them for services they care about. She outlines how, despite this, anti-tax policies became so popular.

Apr 5, 2016

In light of recent news about abortion and birth control, this episode revisits Professor Carole Joffe's interview. She discussed the politics of abortion, the economic importance of reproductive choice, and state-level restrictions to abortion access.

Mar 29, 2016

Professor Arthur MacEwan explains how market regulations - from patent laws to healthcare to early childhood education - can address the roots of economic inequality. To help us improve our podcast, please take our short survey at http://bit.ly/NJsurvey.

Mar 22, 2016

Professor Joshua Inwood describes how truth and reconciliation processes address legacies of racism, violence, and conflict and move toward community healing. To help us improve our podcast, please take our short survey at http://bit.ly/NJsurvey.

Mar 15, 2016

Professor Ciara Torres-Spelliscy stays post-interview to tell the story of a small tech and financial services company with a unique branding problem.

Mar 15, 2016

Professor Ciara Torres-Spelliscy outlines the power of public backlash, shareholder pressure, and consumer boycotts to check corporate spending on political causes. Torres-Spelliscy is an Associate Professor of Law at Stetson University College of Law.

Mar 8, 2016

Professor Dana Fisher shows that policymakers only hear scientific information about climate change that reaffirms their own positions. Fisher is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Maryland.

Mar 1, 2016

Professor Ellen Fitzpatrick tells the stories of three women who - long before Hillary Clinton - sought to win the U.S. presidency despite overwhelming challenges. Fitzpatrick is a Professor of History at the University of New Hampshire.

Feb 23, 2016

Professor Robert Pollin gives three reasons why a $15 minimum wage is feasible for the fast food industry and shows how it is better for workers and the economy overall. Pollin is a Professor of Economics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Feb 16, 2016

Professor Rick Hasen explores why a few wealthy Americans have most of the influence in U.S. politics - and how changing the Supreme Court is the best way to fix that. Hasen is a Professor of Law and Political Science at University of California, Irvine.

Feb 9, 2016

Professor David Schultz explains that only a tiny sliver of the American population - the voters in just 10 swing states - will truly matter in the November presidential election. Schultz is a Professor of Political Science at Hamline University.

Feb 2, 2016

Jackelyn Hwang discusses gentrification in America - how race and class impact who moves where and when. How can decision-makers encourage investment that protects long-time residents? Hwang is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Princeton University.

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