Info

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

No Jargon, the Scholars Strategy Network’s weekly podcast, presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation. Powerful research, intriguing perspectives -- and no jargon. Find show notes and plain-language research briefs on hundreds of topics at www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/nojargon.
RSS Feed
Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon
2018
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2015
December
November
October


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: 2018
Aug 16, 2018

Knowledge is power. Or at least that’s how the saying goes — but when it comes to climate change and its causes, that knowledge hasn’t translated into action. Postdoctoral Fellow Matthew Motta discusses why climate research is often disregarded, where Americans’ suspicion of scientists comes from, and how our interest in science affects our trust in scientists.

For More on this Topic:

Aug 9, 2018

Having a warm and comfortable home is important for health and well-being. But with rising rent prices and growing inequality, it can be tough – if not impossible – to find a place to live. Professors Rosie Tighe and Megan Hatch explain why the U.S. has such a shortage of affordable housing, how government programs help, and why they often fall short.

Aug 2, 2018

Since 9/11, fears about extremism have shaped the public’s view of Islam. And American policies often reflect these fears, zeroing in on Muslims and Muslim-Americans in the name of national security. Professor Rachel Gillum explores whether these policies work, why we use them, and how they impact Muslims in America.

Jul 26, 2018

In April 2018, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand introduced legislation to make basic banking services, like loans and check cashing, available at every branch of the United States Postal Service. Professor Mehrsa Baradaran explains the history of that idea, why postal banking is needed now, and how it can help reduce America’s growing inequality.

Jul 19, 2018

A college degree can make a huge difference for parents and their kids. But if you’ve got an eight-year-old to support and a low-paying job, it’s next to impossible to pay for both tuition and childcare. For residents of Maine, a new law will help. Working with Joby Thoyalil of Maine Equal Justice Partners, Professors Luisa DePrez and Lisa Dodson used their research on the benefits of a college education for low-income women to help advance a bill called LIFT 2.0.

Jul 12, 2018

Lawyers, doctors, engineers, and bankers are among America’s most respected professionals, and most are middle-aged white men. So what are the experiences of black men who join their ranks? Adia Harvey Wingfield describes how black men in high-powered professions navigate race and gender in the workplace, and what their experiences say about our changing economy.

For More on this Topic:

Jul 5, 2018

Since the Cambridge Analytica scandal broke, Americans have been talking about data: what online information is saved, what we should do with it, and who gets to decide. But these conversations often miss an important piece — government data. Professor Matthew Weber lays out what is currently happening with data collection and why we should actually save more information than we currently do.

For More on this Topic:

  • Read about the impossibility of comprehensive digital archives in the Atlantic
  • Check out efforts to preserve federal agency data, featured in Forbes
Jun 28, 2018

Everyone needs healthcare. But Americans can’t agree on how to fix our troubled healthcare system. Now, the Trump Administration and a number of states are pushing one idea — require people on Medicaid to work. Professor Philip Rocco explains what’s behind these new requirements, what they would mean for people on Medicaid, and why they should really be called paperwork requirements.

For More on this Topic:

Jun 22, 2018

The Trump Administration’s zero tolerance policy for migrants produced widespread outrage. Specific policies are in flux, so we asked researchers for the important context to understand what’s happening. For this special episode, professors Heide Castañeda and Nara Milanich describe who these migrants are, how zero tolerance policies impact them and their health, and what – if any – historical precedents exist for these policies.

For More on this Topic:

Jun 21, 2018

Democracy is under threat. From Venezuela to Turkey, from Hungary to the Philippines, powerful leaders are rewriting their countries norms and laws to secure power at the expense of their citizens. Professor Steven Levitsky tells us how democracies die – and what the outlook is for America.

For More on this Topic:

Jun 14, 2018

America is getting more diverse, and that means more children of color are students in our schools. But teachers are still overwhelmingly white, so many of these students rarely see teachers who look like them. Professor Michèle Foster tells the little-known story of why America lost many of its black teachers, what that means for students, and what can be done to change things.

For More on this Topic:

Jun 6, 2018

There are thousands of civic organizations in America, from big-time lobbying groups to local grassroots organizations, and they all want your time and support. But some organizations are more effective at creating change than others. Professor Ziad Munson explains what kinds of organizations have been most successful in shaping American public life – and why.

For More on this Topic:

May 30, 2018

Unions used to be a major political force in America. But over the last few decades they have steadily declined, and now a Supreme Court case might deal another severe blow to their strength. Professor Jake Rosenfeld explains what the Supreme Court is deciding on and what it means for the future of organized labor in America.

For More on this Topic:

May 23, 2018

In 1973, the Supreme Court made access to abortions a legal right. Since then, crisis pregnancy centers have popped up across the country to dissuade women from getting abortions. Professor Kimberly Kelly explains the history and organization behind these centers and how their current case before the Supreme Court could shape reproductive rights in America.

For More on this Topic:

May 16, 2018

The opioid epidemic is ravaging communities across America and there’s no silver bullet to fix it. But communicating to people about risks and steps to prevent addiction is a start. Professor Itzhak Yanovitzky describes how New Jersey uses information to help fight the opioid epidemic and how his research partnership with the state helps to improve these efforts.

For More on this Topic:

May 9, 2018

Following the 2016 election, suburban well-educated women got together in PTA groups, libraries, and coffee shops to organize—some for the first time. Professor Lara Putnam shares insights on how these groups work, what their goals are, and why they have been so effective at mobilizing voters.

For More on this Topic:

May 2, 2018

America—the world’s wealthiest country—is home to over 40 million people living under the poverty line. And for many, there is no safety net to fall back on. Professor Joan Maya Mazelis explains how we got here and highlights one innovative organization, run by and for poor people, that builds community among the poor and provides help when the safety net is missing.

For More on this Topic:

Apr 25, 2018

The Founding Fathers made sure to put checks in place that would prevent a president from becoming a king. But Professor Larry Jacobs explains that when it comes to foreign policy, the president goes largely unchecked. Next, Professor Frances Lee outlines the ways Congress has rebuked presidential power, even under the current administration. And finally, Professor Keith Whittington takes us to the courts, which have been skeptical of many of President Trump’s executive orders.

For More on this Topic:

Apr 18, 2018

US politics is built around two parties, but recently there have been growing rifts between and within them. First, Professor Eliot Cohen explains why some Republicans, like himself, left the party after the 2016 election. Next, Professor Didi Kuo highlights the importance of political parties for democracy and why many voters feel disconnected from them.

For More on this Topic:

Apr 11, 2018

From Sean Hannity to Rachel Maddow, TV and radio hosts are taking stronger ideological stances, telling audiences what is right and wrong in America. Professor Sarah Sobieraj examines this “outrage industry” and what it means for the millions who tune in. Later, she dives into new research on the attacks women face in online spaces.

For More on this Topic:

Apr 4, 2018

At only 20 percent, the number of US Congressional seats held by women ranks 101st in the world. Saskia Brechenmacher explains why this underrepresentation is bad for our democracy and looks at examples abroad to see how we might close the gap.

For More on this Topic:

Mar 28, 2018

Immigration enforcement measures used to be concentrated on America’s borders. But as Professor Yalidy Matos outlines, federal agencies are increasingly partnering with local law enforcement to carry out deportations, leaving immigrant communities uncertain about their futures.

For More on this Topic:

Further Reading:

Mar 21, 2018

For undocumented youth, the chance to receive legal status would be a life changer. Professor Amy Hsin shows how legalization could encourage young immigrants to get a college degree and even reduce the national deficit, all without threatening the wages of U.S. born workers.

For More on this Topic:

Further Reading:

Mar 14, 2018

Family, education, and work—for undocumented people in the U.S., these areas of life are filled with uncertainty. As Professor Roberto Gonzales explains, growing up undocumented can throw your future into limbo.

For More on this Topic:

Further Reading:

Mar 7, 2018

It’s no secret. Our political future is uncertain and unpredictable. Author and scholar Yascha Mounk outlines how economic inequality, a backlash against increasing diversity, and the rise of social media all threaten democracies across the globe—and what we can do to save them.

For More on this Topic:

Further Reading:

1 2 Next »